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(via flavorcats)

djluongo:

kyletwebster:

REBLOG AND WIN! It’s that time again - THREE random winners will be selected to receive a FREE Megapack from KyleBrush.com - these are the best brushes ever created for Photoshop, with over 50,000 users, including elite artists at Sony, Disney, Dreamworks, Marvel, DC, Image, Nike and Google!

This promotion ends Friday, August 1st, 2014.

Love to actually try these out


(via violescence)

rebeccasugar:

Early concepts for how to treat limbs on Steven Universe! 

I wanted to get the most anatomical information out of the least amount of lines. 

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - FOLDSMore on folds today. I will eventually cover all types of folds but today is about simple folds on everyday clothes (t-shirt, jeans). The key is to know what to expect and then applying what you know to simplify what you see in front of you (when life drawing). A lot of the folds dynamics on shirts and jeans come from the “memory” of the fabric itself. Denim is thick and is likely to keep some form of wrinkles or folds around certain areas (knees). A lot of zig-zag patterns around the knee is very likely. When pushed down on the feet, the denim fabric will bunch up and combine with the zig-zag pattern. Shirts and t-shirts will react to the twist and pull of the arms and torso. Identify where the pull (or tension) is coming from and work from it. I tend to draw the seams because they clearly express the volumes underneath.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - FOLDS

More on folds today. I will eventually cover all types of folds but today is about simple folds on everyday clothes (t-shirt, jeans). The key is to know what to expect and then applying what you know to simplify what you see in front of you (when life drawing). A lot of the folds dynamics on shirts and jeans come from the “memory” of the fabric itself. Denim is thick and is likely to keep some form of wrinkles or folds around certain areas (knees). A lot of zig-zag patterns around the knee is very likely. When pushed down on the feet, the denim fabric will bunch up and combine with the zig-zag pattern. Shirts and t-shirts will react to the twist and pull of the arms and torso. Identify where the pull (or tension) is coming from and work from it. I tend to draw the seams because they clearly express the volumes underneath.

Norm


(via grizandnorm)

(via palliase)

pachurz:

Some building block references my Life Drawing teacher drew up for us for our Figure Drawing class. Thought I would impart the wisdom.


(via eyecaging)
grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - ClothingAs always, simple is best. Clothing and fabric can be wonderful to explore in an illustration or detailed sketch, but it tends to get tiresome to overdo it in storyboarding.If you have questions or requests, message us. We might just addresses those in future Tuesday Tips!Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Clothing

As always, simple is best. Clothing and fabric can be wonderful to explore in an illustration or detailed sketch, but it tends to get tiresome to overdo it in storyboarding.

If you have questions or requests, message us. We might just addresses those in future Tuesday Tips!

Norm


(via grizandnorm)

pascalcampion:

More GrizandNorm tips. These are just amazing… simple, effective, to the point and instantly usable.
If you guys don’t know about GrizandNorm, you should definitely check them out.

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips — Painting a shiny object

the steps are:

1.  matte base object

2.  add ceiling reflection 

3.  highlight

yes, it is that simple.  Throughout the years, I learn to edit.  It’s unnecessary to paint or render every single grain of hair and detail.  It’s about communicating the idea across.  A lot of it is about believability.  I find this technique works for me.  And as always, it is a good idea to practice it on a simple basic primitives.  (I know, I know, it’s not the most exciting thing).  But you will be surprise on how fast you can paint when you master your basic shapes. 

Attached are gif I made to show you my steps on a sphere, and one of my shoe illustration I painted using the same technique.

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - FeetI don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Feet

I don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.

Norm


(via grizandnorm)